Monthly Archives: October 2011

The end of the Symbian era

Heavy clouds seem to have been hanging over the Symbian platform since February 11 this year, when the new CEO Stephen Elop announced that Nokia has chosen Windows Phone for its devices as the main operating system in the future. It was obvious for some that Symbian’s, as well as Qt’s end have been called. Although, Nokia still claimed that it’s formerly dominant platform will still be evolving and the Qt platform will be there.

I’ve lost my job as a Symbian developer at the beginning of the year, and I was wondering if there’s a place for a Symbian/Qt developer in the market yet. I’ve trusted Nokia’s promises. I’ve decided to continue with the Qt framework for development. I’ve been attending events that gathered people interested in that technology (starting in 2009 with the Meego long weekend Barcelona, followed by the Symbian Exchange and Exposition in 2009 and 2010, volunteered at Symbian stand at MWC in 2010, attended Nokia Dev Day at MWC 2011, Qt labs in Madrid in April this year, Intel AppUp labs for Meego in February and June), I’ve been observing trends in freelance projects (www.elance.com) and yet trying to search for opportunities locally. Unfortunately all of these intents (robotic laugh here) were unsuccessful. Some of the clients I’ve talked to were very interested in Qt development at the beginning (March-June) but soon they all changed their decisions to go away from native development towards HTML5 or simply drop the Symbian project as not worth the investment. By the end of August there were virtually no signs of interest in Symbian/Qt development.

In the meantime I was still working on my own projects for the Ovi Store (BiCitizen , Siberdrome, Solitarius) so I didn’t just lose my time thinking of the wasted opportunities. Although, it was obvious that at some point I will have to move elsewhere as the promises of Qt for the next billion were too vague. Having in mind previous Nokia’s promises about Qt, I guess it was not worth wasting the time to wait for another market opportunity. Now, that even Intel moved away from the Qt platform with Tizen, please raise your hands up, who are still planning the mobile Qt project soon.

I must say I’ve achieved something more than decent in the Ovi Store. “Solitarius” game has been downloaded more than 350.000 times in over 200 countries and other game, “Siberdrome” (only Symbian^3) almost 30.000 in last 3 months. But If I see similar games on the Android Market, (i.e. this Solitaire game) which achieved over 10 million downloads, it’s just hard to compare the range of success.

Nokia World event is approaching so we can expect the appearance of the Nokia Windows Phone, but is the Windows Phone the best direction for the Symbian/Qt developers?

I’ve worked with Symbian C++ since 2006. At first using the Visual Studio but then the Carbide/Eclipse environment since it was enough stable to be usable (which dates back to 2007) and finally accustomed myself to it’s flexibility and extensibility. Qt SDK came with the custom IDE that couldn’t be compared to any other IDE with which I’ve worked with so far. Although fast and well designed, it was sometimes inconvenient. Qt APIs are great on the other hand so I couldn’t complain too much about developing with the formerly-Trolltech’s SDK. It was a huge step forward from the obsolete Symbian C++ environment.

Having all this baggage I’ve brought with me from Nokia, I’ve decided to step away from it and started the Android development. This is probably obvious for those who did the same, but what a relief it was to come back to this great open-source Eclipse IDE. How nice to see many APIs and classes resemble those from Qt, and have those XML layouts which are not so far from Qt layouts and Qt-Quick. Already at the beginning I felt like I’m one leg in the Android ecosystem. Being able to quickly compile and package multi-language application with support for multiple resolutions and well-defined backwards compatibility, I was so happy I almost peed in my pants*… I wonder if heads of Nokia thought about this convenience for a while, while deciding to make a change of environment for the developers. Maybe the biggest enemy was actually a close friend here.

I’ve never taken Nokia’s decisions personally and was never angry at the changes in their plans and shifts of strategy. While living in Spain, I’ve watched how Spanish government had to make serious cuts in the public sector recently to save the country’s economy. Having seen the movement of “Indignados”, protesting against decisions of the government, sometimes in a very inappropriate way, I’ve decided it’s just a wrong to outrage. Showing that you can live well to someone who put you in a very difficult situation is much healthier response than revenge.

At the moment, that’s for sure, none of my friends wants a Symbian smartphone anymore. One of them who went to a few stores to get advices on smartphones recently, heard from sellers to get out of Symbian (not to mention allusions to the human waste). Those I know still choose other brands in spite of the reasonable effort I put to tell them something good about Nokias. My girlfriend is a great example here. She got two of her pictures into the www.nokiacreative.com contest for August. People are impressed with the quality of the N8’s pictures, but they get put off when they hear the “S” word.

This way I’ve joined the club of the green mushroom-like avatars, waving my hand to the new world. I don’t say goodbye to Nokia forever. Maybe we will cross our paths in the future. Maybe I will actually use one of the technologies they develop. But even now, eight months after the February 11 announcement I’m still confused which development platform they try to focus on. Is it Windows Phone? Is it Qt? Is it S40 with J2ME?

*Not for warmth